How To Word Your Wedding Invitations

We are frequently asked to advise our couples on the wording for their wedding invitations, as it can be a bewildering exercise in etiquette, not to mention a delicate balance of politics and personality. It’s also difficult to know what information to include, from names and children to plus ones and gifts. We always tell our couples that the invitation wording should ultimately reflect the style formality of your wedding but also be personal to you. It’s important for your invites to sound like they have been written by the people who are hosting it, and as everybody speaks and behaves differently, the way you invite your guests to celebrate your special day will be unique to you!

 

1. Traditionally, the bride’s family would contribute most to the wedding and therefore host the celebration. As a result, they would be the ones to invite the guests to celebrate their daughter’s marriage, so their names will appear on the invitations. 

For example:

David and Angela Kent

Request the pleasure of your company

At the marriage of their daughter

Sophie Jane Kent

to

Joshua Mark O'Sullivan

 

Wedding Invitations Wording: Top Tips 

2. For a less traditional but still formal invitation, the names of the host parents can be left out. Simply including the fact that the couple and their families are inviting the guests may suffice. Choosing more formal vocabulary will also help, for example:

Catherine & Leigh

Together with their families

Request the pleasure of your company at their wedding

 

Wedding Invitations Wording: Top Tips

 

 

3. For a less formal approach to wording your wedding stationery, which also works well if it's the couple that are paying for the wedding, keep it simple:

You are invited

To celebrate the wedding of

Sam Winterbourne 

&

Nick Chapman

 

OR

 

Esme & Alex

Would love you to celebrate their wedding day

Please join them at 3pm on Saturday 16th September 2017


Wedding Invitations Wording: Top Tips

 

For your Details or Information card that you might choose to accompany the invitation, we recommend covering off some key essentials:

- The full address of the venue including postcode for SatNav systems

- Details of booked or bookable accommodation that guests may need to know

- Dress code if there is one

- Whether any transportation has been arranged between various locations during the wedding day (or days) or whether guests should pre-arrange

- Giving parents advanced notice of a child-free wedding. Some examples we've used before include:

"Unfortunately our venue cannot accommodate children, and if required we would like to help parents in making childcare arrangements"

OR

"We have decided to have an adults-only wedding day and we hope this gives you a chance to let your hair down too!"

- Details of any gift preferences. Wording this can be a minefield too, as guests will always want to gift you something regardless of your politeness and protestations, and the more direct you are, the easier it will be for guests (and the more likely it will be that you will end up with something you both want and love!) 

- How and by when you would like your guests to RSVP

- Links to a wedding website for more information if you have one

- Details about any pre- or post-wedding celebrations that you'd like your guests to join you at

 

We highly recommend having a wedding website to give guests full information, and to  allow guests to easily RSVP at the click of a button. There are some great options for web-building novices out there, free of charge and no coding experience required! Our favourites are Getting Married and The Knot

 

Don't forget we can help with all your wedding stationery. Make an appointment to meet with our creative team at our London studio to chat colours, paper stocks and details over a tea, and understand more about the luxury printing process. We'll provide you with a quotation that's bespoke to your requirements. Please get in touch on hello@quilllondon.com or 020 7833 8562 to enquire, and we'd be happy to help.